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Trust to take on urgent care revamp


21 November 2014

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Herefordshire clinical commissioning group (CCG) has invited the local trust to lead a transformation to bring urgent care services closer to home.

Following patient feedback, the CCG decided to change the way they commission urgent care to focus on the services that were a priority to Heresford residents and to allow providers the freedom to intergrate with one another.

According to David Farnsworth, CCG executive lead nurse, resident priorities include:

 – Getting clearer information about the help available.

Herefordshire clinical commissioning group (CCG) has invited the local trust to lead a transformation to bring urgent care services closer to home.

Following patient feedback, the CCG decided to change the way they commission urgent care to focus on the services that were a priority to Heresford residents and to allow providers the freedom to intergrate with one another.

According to David Farnsworth, CCG executive lead nurse, resident priorities include:

 – Getting clearer information about the help available.

 – Feeling confident they can get help when needed,

 – Knowing the help will be relevant to their individual circumstances.

 – Knowing that services will be safe and efficient.

He added “Older patients particularly want to be as independent as possible but able to get support if it’s needed.”

The change comes as Wye Valley trust (WVT) struggles to keep on top of A&E admissions. Hereford County Hospital is currently discharging between 40-50 patients staying more than one night to keep up with demand for beds, while also aiming to reduce the number of patients admitted to hospital.

WVT has been invited to present proposals on the future pathway of urgent care and how they would adapt to being a leading healthcare provider.

Richard Beeken, WVT chief executive, said that, despite its special measures status, a detailed plan was underway to implement the work.

“This involves a number of changes to the way we operate and gives us the opportunity to shape services and align our plans to meet the requirements of our commissioners, which includes the CCG.”

“Of course, we can’t do this in isolation, and we shall be working closely with our commissioners, patients and a range of other parties to break down traditional barriers and develop innovative approaches and partnerships to meet the challenges before us,” he said.

Should the proposals be successful and meet the CCG’s requirements they could be implemented by the end of 2015.

 

 

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