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Spending review will “push carers to breaking point” warns charity


26 November 2015

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The government’s spending review has fallen short of the funding needed for the care sector, and as a result will push carers for disabled, older or levitra basso prezzo seriously-ill loved ones to “breaking point” a leading charity has warned.

The government’s spending review has fallen short of the funding needed for the care sector, and as a result will push carers for disabled, older or cialis next day delivery seriously-ill loved ones to “breaking point” a leading charity has warned.

Carers UK applauded local authorities new power to raise care funding through council tax, and a boosted Better Care Fund, but Heléna Herklots, chief executive, said that “although welcome, this extra money falls far cialis daily canada short of the funding needed to provide the vital care that older and disabled people need”.

She said: “Without access to social care, families have to step in, meaning they are providing more and more care at greater cost to their own health, wellbeing and financial security. Carers are already saving the UK economy £132 billion every year with the unpaid care they provide.

“Increased NHS funding is welcome, and is needed to bring a more integrated health and care system, but by missing its opportunity to invest in care, the government is sabotaging its own plans for canadian viagra and healthcare a more efficient and productive NHS.
 
“Carers facing tax credit cuts will be relieved at this reprieve from the chancellor but further changes to housing benefit are likely to add to the financial pressures that many carers are facing. If the government’s manifesto commitment to improve support for full-time carers is to be met, the impact of these changes on carers needs to be carefully considered,” Herklots added.

In light of the spending review the charity is calling for a more carer-friendly NHS including carer passports, and a mandatory 5-10 days of paid care leave from work so that carers can juggle their caring responsibilities without it negatively impacting their employment and financial security, as well as a government scheme to improve the financial support available for carers.

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