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‘Patients have too little say in healthcare services’


1 September 2014

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Services are becoming increasingly fragmented and underfunded, a health and care charity coalition has claimed. 
National Voices has warned that there is too little voice for patients and families, and says that fully involving people in decisions is the key to improvement.
The next government should make person-centred care the central ambition for health reform, providing consistent leadership, more funding and stability, the charity claims.  

Services are becoming increasingly fragmented and underfunded, a health and care charity coalition has claimed. 
National Voices has warned that there is too little voice for patients and families, and says that fully involving people in decisions is the key to improvement.
The next government should make person-centred care the central ambition for health reform, providing consistent leadership, more funding and stability, the charity claims.  
The group want to see government supporting local efforts which personalise and coordinate services, particularly for people with chronic conditions and disabilities, with public agencies, voluntary groups and local communities working together.
National Voices chief executive, Jeremy Taylor, said that although there is a growing consensus about what great care looks like and how to achieve it, progress towards getting there is "too slow". 
He said: "We want to see genuinely person centred care by 2020. Lots of things are needed for this, but above all a different attitude. 
"Healthcare reform has been dominated by politics, economics, and professional and organisational priorities. We want to see reform starting with people – with the pattern of services driven by what matters to patients, carers and communities.” 
National Voices members have called on the government to:
 1. Target public health. 
 2. Make people the priority, not the system. 
 3. Support people with chronic conditions and disabilities.   
 4. Create people-powered services. 
 5. Fund health and care properly.  
 6. No more top-down reorganisations.  

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