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Nine out of ten CCGs request co-commissioning powers


1 July 2014

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Most clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) have formally asked to co-commission primary care services, NHS England has revealed. 
Newly released figures show that 183 out of 211 CCGs applied for the new powers, which will allow local clinicians to redesign out of hospital care. 
An NHS England board paper reveals that the new powers could include: 
 – Assessment of needs.
 – Decision making on strategic priorities with Health and Wellbeing Boards.

Most clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) have formally asked to co-commission primary care services, NHS England has revealed. 
Newly released figures show that 183 out of 211 CCGs applied for the new powers, which will allow local clinicians to redesign out of hospital care. 
An NHS England board paper reveals that the new powers could include: 
 – Assessment of needs.
 – Decision making on strategic priorities with Health and Wellbeing Boards.
 – Designing and negotiating local contracts.
 – Managing financial resources.
 – Monitoring contractual performance.
The paper sets out three different levels of co-commissioning, which will require different levels of governance:
1.  Where CCGs would have greater involvement in influencing commissioning decisions made by NHS England area teams.
2.  Where CCGs would jointly commission services with NHS England.
3.  Where NHS England would delegate commissioning arrangements to CCGs.
NHS England chief executive Simon Stevens said: "Empowering local clinicians to redesign out of hospital care is an important next step in creating an NHS that is more flexible, more adaptable, where national and local thinking converges to create sustainable paths for particular communities. 
"A growing and ageing population coupled with the increasing prevalence of obesity, dementia and multiple long-term conditions all mean that our patients' needs and preferences are changing. Legacy models of care are losing their relevance. New technologies are opening up new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment. We need new commissioning approaches and accelerated redesign of care delivery."

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