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Learning disability commissioning set to improve


16 July 2014

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A national guide is being developed to help local commissioners provide better support for people with learning disabilities at home and in the community. 
Sir Stephen Bubb, chief executive of charity leaders network ACEVO, will head a group of experts and advisors, with the aim of reducing reliance on hospital care. 
The group aims to: 
 – Develop models for local implementation that meet the needs of people with learning disabilities and autism.
 – Develop funding models for new services.

A national guide is being developed to help local commissioners provide better support for people with learning disabilities at home and in the community. 
Sir Stephen Bubb, chief executive of charity leaders network ACEVO, will head a group of experts and advisors, with the aim of reducing reliance on hospital care. 
The group aims to: 
 – Develop models for local implementation that meet the needs of people with learning disabilities and autism.
 – Develop funding models for new services.
 – Identify potential sources of social investment.
 – Identify the best way for funding to meet individual need.
 – Seek input and guidance from partners working in this field.
Sir Stephen said: “While I am delighted that Simon Stevens has asked me to help create a plan to support the Government meet that pledge, I am also determined to bring the experience and strength of the third sector to help transform care for people with learning disabilities.
“Co-commissioning with charities and social enterprises in this way is unprecedented in the NHS and offers new solutions to these problems. I believe that the third sector will bring the innovation required to create a sustainable ‘national framework, locally delivered’.” 
Chief nursing officer for NHS England, Jane Cummings, said it is vital that people with learning disabilities, autism, or challenging behavior have health and care support in their homes and communities. 
She said: “Too often we see people being admitted to an inpatient setting and staying for long periods of time purely because this support is lacking. 
“But many areas need wider service redesign, greater integration and longer-term, sustainable solutions. We are seeing more co-commissioning with local authorities but this needs to be expanded and accelerated. We need to ensure that funding follows the individual. The new group will drive this, drawing on essential expertise from the third sector and importantly from patients and carers.” 
The group is expected to report their findings in October 2014. 

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