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CQC works with commissioners on emergency home closure

CQC works with commissioners on emergency home closure

16 December 2014

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The emergency closure of a failing nursing home in Surrey has been ordered by the Care Quality Commission (CQC). 

The health and care regulator worked with the local authority and the local clinical commissioning group to ensure the home’s closure after inspections took place on 28 November and 1 December.

The inspections took place in response to concerns raised by Surrey County Council surrounding the quality of care given to patients.

The emergency closure of a failing nursing home in Surrey has been ordered by the Care Quality Commission (CQC). 

The health and care regulator worked with the local authority and the local clinical commissioning group to ensure the home’s closure after inspections took place on 28 November and 1 December.

The inspections took place in response to concerns raised by Surrey County Council surrounding the quality of care given to patients.

Inspectors found that residents – many with conditions such as dementia – were being washed in cold water and were at risk of developing bedsores.

Staff were not supporting people to eat, and inspectors saw incidents of poor manual handling. Some staff working in the home had not had criminal records checks, and staff were working up to 60 hours a week.

It is also alleged that the home smelt of urine and that some residents had been unable to get downstairs for weeks on end due to a broken lift.

Adrian Hughes, Deputy Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care in the south for CQC, said:

“We have worked with the responsible local authority and the local clinical commissioning group and confirmed with both agencies on 5 December that we would be serving the notice requiring the immediate closure of the home on Tuesday to allow time for people to move.

"Our understanding is that while the local authority had ensured that new accommodation was ready for all those they needed to move, an issue arose on the 9 December regarding the attendance of the transport services arranged by the CCG which delayed transfers until later in the day. This of course caused additional distress for the residents and their families which everyone involved would have wished to avoid.”

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