This site is intended for health professionals only

CQC: Patients ‘distressed’ by poor service transitions


10 June 2014

Share this story:
There is "no excuse" for commissioners to ignore national guidance on supporting young people with long-term health needs, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has warned. 
Young people with physical disabilities or illnesses are not always receiving the necessary care and support when they move to adult services, despite guidance being available for the past ten years, the CQC found. 

There is "no excuse" for commissioners to ignore national guidance on supporting young people with long-term health needs, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has warned. 
Young people with physical disabilities or illnesses are not always receiving the necessary care and support when they move to adult services, despite guidance being available for the past ten years, the CQC found. 
A report released by the organisation revealed that some children's services are stopped before the equivalent adult services have started. 
Families are left "confused and distressed" by the lack of information during the transition period, CQC claims. 
Four priorities for action have been set by CQC: 
 1. Commissioners and providers must listen to, involve and learn from young people and their families about what they want from their care.
 2. Existing national guidance must be followed so that young people are appropriately supported through their transition. 
 3. GPs should be more involved, and at an earlier stage, in planning for transition.
 4. Services must be tailored to meet the needs of young people transferring from children's health services and include extra training for healthcare staff, such as community nurses, in caring for young people.
Professor Steve Field, CQC chief inspector of general practice said: "Despite plenty of guidance being available on what good transition planning and commissioning should look like, there continues to be a significant shortfall between policy and practice. There is no excuse for people not receiving the care they need.
"While our review found many committed professionals who provide excellent care, there needs to be a system-wide change, with commissioners and providers of health and social care working together at every level." 
CQC will begin to investigate transition arrangements when it visits primary and community healthcare services. Its findings will be reflected in the overall rating – of Outstanding, Good, Requires Improvement, or Inadequate – that CQC will award to services. 

Want news like this straight to your inbox?

Related news

Proposal to mandate more GP roles on ICBs backed by BMA
The BMA has backed a proposed amendment to the Health and Care Bill that would...
GPs told of 40-day indicative waits for urgent breast cancer referrals
A London CCG has informed GPs of urgent cancer referral waiting times of up to...