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Child services commissioning transferring to local authorities


31 July 2015

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The responsibility for commissioning public health services for children aged 0-five will transfer from NHS England to local authorities from 1 October 2015.

The idea behind this switch is that councils will have a better understanding of local needs, and can link to the housing sector, early years education providers and to enable the integration of children’s services.

The responsibility for commissioning public health services for children aged 0-five will transfer from NHS England to local authorities from 1 October 2015.

The idea behind this switch is that councils will have a better understanding of local needs, and can link to the housing sector, early years education providers and to enable the integration of children’s services.

NHS area teams will no longer lead on commissioning The 0-5 Healthy Child Programme includes health visiting services (and the 4,5,6 service model) and Family Nurse Partnership services (targeted service for teenage mothers).

The Child Health Information Systems, to be reviewed in 2020; and the six-eight week GP check (also known as the Child Health Surveillance) will not transfer to local authorities.

Local authorities are already responsible for commissioning public health services and other services for children aged five-19, after public health responsibility was transferred from NHS England to local authorities in 2013.

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