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Charity releases youth mental health commissioning guides


2 May 2014

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Three briefings on commissioning for young people's mental health issues have been issued. 
The briefings from advice and counselling charity Youth Access aim to provide guidance for the NHS and local authorities on developing holistic services for young people in transition, joined up commissioning and to commissioning counselling services. 
Youth Access has placed emphasis on young person-focused services aimed at people aged between 11-25. 

Three briefings on commissioning for young people's mental health issues have been issued. 
The briefings from advice and counselling charity Youth Access aim to provide guidance for the NHS and local authorities on developing holistic services for young people in transition, joined up commissioning and to commissioning counselling services. 
Youth Access has placed emphasis on young person-focused services aimed at people aged between 11-25. 
According to the charity, there is potential to increase access, improve service quality, achieve better outcomes and save money. 
Barbara Rayment, director of Youth Access, said: “Successive governments have identified the gaps and barriers in mental health services for young people. However, the focus has consistently been on trying to make the gap between statutory CAMHS and adult mental health services work better for the relatively small numbers in this system. Far less attention has been focused on those who, for whatever reason, are not accessing statutory services or on questioning why this might be the case. 
"It’s high time we started to offer something better – and essential that we build on the good practice and effective service models that are already out there.”
Simon Blake, chief executive of sexual health charity Brook, said: "We know integration is vital because young people tell us it is. They don't want to have to navigate complicated, fragmented services in order to get the support and advice they need. It is our responsibility as policy makers, service providers and supporters of young people, to respond to their needs and give them the services they need."
Sue Bailey, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: “It is good to see that the importance of safeguarding young people’s mental health – an issue the college has championed for years – is finally gaining greater recognition from Government. 
"And, with this latest guidance, commissioners have an opportunity to ensure services for these young people are joined up, tackle transitions, and give greater access to the care they need and deserve.”
The briefings are available to view on the Youth Access website

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