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Adult social care spending statistics released


9 December 2014

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Local councils are spending more on health and social care than a decade ago statistics have shown.

Figures from the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) collected from 152 local authorities in England show that in real terms councils spent £15.9 billion on social service support ten years ago.

This peaked at £18.2 billion in 2009-2010 before dropping to £17.2 billion in 2013-2014.

Local councils are spending more on health and social care than a decade ago statistics have shown.

Figures from the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) collected from 152 local authorities in England show that in real terms councils spent £15.9 billion on social service support ten years ago.

This peaked at £18.2 billion in 2009-2010 before dropping to £17.2 billion in 2013-2014.

During the ten year period from 2003-04, when the figure was £12.5 billion, expenditure increased by 38% in cash terms and 8% in real terms.

For 2013-14 the proportion of expenditure spent on residential care was 43% (£7.5 billion), a decrease from 44% in both 2012-13 and 2008-09. Expenditure on day and domiciliary care increased to 46% (£7.9 billion) in 2013-14, from 45% in 2012-13 and 43% in 2008-09.

The remaining 11% (£1.9 billion) of expenditure in 2013-14 was spent on assessment and care management, this proportion was unchanged to 2012-13, but represents a 1% decrease from 2008-09.

HSCIC chair, Kingsley Manning, said: “This detailed breakdown of spending on adult social services should prove useful to the public, social care professionals and planners.”

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