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£1.2m study to assess Salford’s integrated care


18 June 2014

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A study involving 4,000 people aged over 65 will evaluate the effectiveness of the Salford’s ground-breaking integrated care programme.
The Salford Integrated Care Programme (SICP) allows people to access community resources and support through a contact centre.

A study involving 4,000 people aged over 65 will evaluate the effectiveness of the Salford’s ground-breaking integrated care programme.
The Salford Integrated Care Programme (SICP) allows people to access community resources and support through a contact centre.
The Comprehensive Longitudinal Assessment of Salford Integrated Care (CLASSIC) programme will aim to see whether the SICP leads to better care and support outcomes for older people, according to theprincipal investigator from the University of Manchester’s centre for primary care, Professor Peter Bower.
Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford City Council, NHS Salford Clinical Commissioning Group and Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust are all working together to help with the initiative.Executive director of strategy and development at Salford Royal, Jack Sharp said: “Over the next 18 months Salford will be implementing a new model of care which will enable older people to retain their independence, have greater input into their own care and gain access to rapid support when it is required. The CLASSIC research study will enable us to understand the impact we are having, not just on how older people use services but their experience of the care we provide.”
The National Institute for Health Research Health Services and Delivery Research (NIHR HS & DR)-funded programme will measure changes in the health and experience of care of older people, aged 65 and above every 6 months through surveys.
Manchester City Mayor, Ian Stewart said: “We are developing a pioneering partnership which will revolutionise services for older people in Salford. Our aim is to keep people healthy, happy and independent in their own homes for as long as possible and to make sure they have first class services when they need them.”
Health and social care organisations in Salford and the University of Manchester are collaborating to make sure that the different services are coordinated and work together effectively to gain best possible results from SCIP.
Professor Bower said: “There is worldwide interest in developing new ways of delivering services to better meet the needs of people with long-term conditions such as diabetes, arthritis and heart disease. People often feel that their needs are not met by current services, which are designed to treat individual diseases rather than taking a more comprehensive perspective.”
Healthcare professionals will also be consulted in the study to weigh-in their perspective on the changes SCIP has made.

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