This site is intended for health professionals only

Blood cancer drug provided on Welsh NHS

Blood cancer drug provided on Welsh NHS

10 February 2015

Share this story:


Leukaemia patients in Wales will be given the chance to get a new cancer drug free on the NHS.

Ponatinib – also known as Iclusig – will be offered if other drugs fail.

No other part of the UK makes the drug routinely available for patients with all forms of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the Welsh government said.

Health minister Mark Drakeford said Wales had a "robust system" in place to make effective treatments available.

Leukaemia patients in Wales will be given the chance to get a new cancer drug free on the NHS.

Ponatinib – also known as Iclusig – will be offered if other drugs fail.

No other part of the UK makes the drug routinely available for patients with all forms of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the Welsh government said.

Health minister Mark Drakeford said Wales had a "robust system" in place to make effective treatments available.

The drug is available on the NHS in England but only for patients with a particular form of CML.

Approval was given after a recommendation from the All Wales Medicines Strategy Group.

A spokesperson for Leukaemia and Lymphoma Research said that while most patients would not need the drug, it was welcomed as an "extra safety net" for those who find other drugs do not work.

Want news like this straight to your inbox?

Related news

AI rapid research fund to tackle NHS winter crisis
As many as 16 rapid research projects have been awarded £800,000 funding to assess how...
NHS strikes to run into March: Full walkout timeline
NHS strikes continue this week and will run through February and into March, with union...