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Hospital-led mental health care shows “no notable improvement”

Hospital-led mental health care shows “no notable improvement”

Hospital-led mental health services in the community have shown “no notable improvement” in the last year, a survey by the Care Quality Commission revealed
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Hospital-led mental health services in the community have shown “no notable improvement” in the last year, a survey by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) revealed.

The annual survey – of more than 13,000 mental health patients – assessed people’s experience of the care and support they received from hospital-led services such as community-based clinics or in their own homes.

When people were asked to rate their overall experience of their community mental health care on a scale of 0 to 10, with 10 being excellent, more people reported a poorer experience compared to last year; 28% rated it as five or lower, compared to 25% in 2014.

Dr Paul Lelliott, deputy chief inspector of hospitals (lead for mental health) said: “Overall it is disappointing that there has been no notable improvement from last year’s survey. In particular, the fact that over a quarter of people reported a poor experience of their care is worrying and must be acted on."

The report says that a small group of organisations performed poorly in a number of questions: Coventry and Warwickshire Partnership NHS Trust; Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust; Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; and North Essex Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust The Isle of Wight NHS Trust.

However, those that scored ‘better than expected’ for 10% or more of all of the questions are: Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust; Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; Mersey Care NHS Trust; NAVIGO Health and Social Care CIC; and Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust.

To view the full report click here.

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