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Healthcare leaders slam Osborne's Autumn Statement

Healthcare leaders slam Osborne's Autumn Statement

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No additional funding will be provided for the struggling health service although Britain’s economic recovery plan appears to be working.

Chancellor George Osborne did not propose any amendments or updates to NHS funding although he believes that by 2018/19 the UK will be running a “surplus”. 

However, the Chancellor did announce that the pension age will be raised sooner than expected. Now it will go up to 68 in the mid 2030s, rather than 2044 and 2046 as originally planned. 

Dr Peter Carter, chief executive and general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing said: “It is not credible that the government has any evidence that nurses and other health care staff will be able to deliver the level of service that they do now when they are 68. 

“There should be a great deal of caution before any further rises to the retirement age of health care workers are considered, due to the unique nature and demands of this job and the implications that such a rise could have on patient care.”

Dr Mark Porter, chair of the British Medical Association council said:  “While the government claims the health budget is protected, in reality billions of pounds are going back to the Treasury each year and the NHS is also having to make £20billion in efficiency savings, the bulk of which is coming from the continued erosion of staff pay.



“This is simply unsustainable. If the government doesn’t work with staff and other stakeholders to find innovative ways of delivering a cost effective health service then frontline services will be hit and, ultimately, the quality of patient care will be compromised.”

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