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CQC: Manchester Hospital improves as Cumbrian hospital requires support

CQC: Manchester Hospital improves as Cumbrian hospital requires support

Tameside General Hospital in Greater Manchester has been taken out of special measures after two years of “significant” improvements, but North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust will remain in special measures, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) revealed
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Tameside General Hospital in Greater Manchester has been taken out of special measures after two years of “significant” improvements, but North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust will remain in special measures, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) revealed.

Inspectors found that Tameside General Hospital Foundation Trust has made significant progress to improve, “particularly in critical care services” which were previously rated inadequate, and “also in dealing with governance and patient complaints” the report said.

The reasons for the trust being placed into special measures by Monitor, following a recommendation by Sir Bruce Keogh in July 2013, included concerns about mortality rates, care of emergency and deteriorating patients, staffing levels, patient experience and leadership.

In response, professor Sir Mike Richards, the Chief Inspector of Hospitals, said: "The trust has been going through a period of significant change. On our most recent inspection we have seen for ourselves that there is now a stronger culture, which is committed to putting patients and safety first.

“The senior management team has led this programme of change, taking care to involve staff to ensure that this improvement is sustained. This is a credit to all the staff; we found them to be a highly dedicated workforce, committed to caring for their patients,” he added.

In contrast, North Cumbria University Hospitals NHS Trust, which was also put in special measures two years ago, had been deemed to have made significant improvements however inspectors were “particularly concerned by its difficulties in the recruitment and retention of doctors and nursing staff”.

While the trust made significant improvements in surgery, outpatients, and services to children and young people, the CQC said concerns remained in other areas, particularly in medical care.

Commenting on this, Richards added:“While the trust continues to make progress, I remain particularly concerned by its difficulties in the recruitment and retention of doctors and nursing staff, and the impact this is having on the quality and timeliness of services for patients.”

Although the trust was rated as good in terms of being caring, and the staff at the trust were praised, it will “require continued support for the foreseeable future” the report said.

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